Freeing The Female Orgasm

Freeing The Female Orgasm

Neither the shy child nor the outgoing child is doomed to become sexually addicted - because the intimacy problems involved with sexual addiction do not begin in childhood. They begin and end with adult choices. No one needs to waste years contemplating childhood traumas to overcome sex addiction. The answer begins with understanding yourself as the person you are, not the person you were decades ago. One of the great rewards of overcoming sex addiction lies in genuinely fulfilling the need for emotional, romantic, and sexual intimacy in the present.

The biggest barrier to orgasm for women is mental distraction - thoughts that float into her mind, catching her in her head, and taking her away from what's going on in her body. As soon as she starts thinking, she is out of the moment and will lose touch with her senses and her pleasure. Some of these thoughts may trigger feelings of shame or guilt about experiencing sexual pleasure, for no matter how liberated our attitudes toward sex seem to have become, there yet exists the perception that "good" girls don't! Even today women are divided into categories of "virgin" or "whore". Those who engage lustily in the delights of the body are somehow morally questionable. You can help your delectable partner move beyond these pleasure stifling attitudes by letting her know how much you respect, admire and cherish her fully female sensual self. Tell her often, especially when you're making love, that it thoroughly turns you on to see her let loose the passionate side of her nature.

There are only two rules for no-strings sex. They are very simple rules. Rule #1: Mutual consent for everything is mandatory. By “mutual consent” we mean that all aspects of your lovemaking are agreed to by both. You meet together on the sexual playing field as equals. No one gets physically hurt. When your partner says “I don’t want to do that” or “stop, that hurts” you must stop instantly. This is where “no” always means no. Rule #2: Don’t try to find her later!

During adolescence, young people put into practice risk-taking behaviors as they are trying to find their own identity and become more independent. This makes them very vulnerable to experimenting or becoming addicted to drugs and alcohol, sexual activity, and defiance of authority, especially if there is peer pressure to do so. Adolescents who use drugs are also more likely to become involved in gang activity, have low self-esteem, behavior problems, school performance problems, and depression.